Search News

Results: 71-80 of 114


Children 'exercise less as they get older'

19 Jul 2017

Drop in activity levels are "concerning"
Read more…

The Coach Pro show rides with Maxxis

13 Jul 2017

Maxxis has been announced as the official tyre supplier of the second series of the popular The Coach Pro show. 
Read more…

Safer roads and building confidence could see ‘seismic shift' in the number of women cycling

11 Jul 2017

Safer space for cycling could help thousands more women get on their bikes.

Read more…

Almost half of Brits set to enjoy staycation this year

22 Jun 2017

Many prefer the cheaper alternative to going abroad
Read more…

Average teens as sedentary as 60-year-olds, study finds

21 Jun 2017

Teenagers not meetin WHO recommendations

Read more…

Brits urged to ditch cars to combat air pollution

20 Jun 2017

Cycling and walking exposes people to less air pollution
Read more…

One in four families not comfortable cycling, says survey

12 Jun 2017

Traffic fears and uncertain weather are preventing families cycling
Read more…

Family is key to growing golf, says study

2 Jun 2017

Family crucial to grow golf
Read more…

57% growth for UK triathlon industry

30 May 2017

TIA publishes annual triathlon report
Read more…

Back to news menu

Average teens as sedentary as 60-year-olds, study finds

Posted on in Outdoor News

Research suggests that the average teen is no more active than the average 60-year-old.

Researchers analysed data from more than 12,500 people of various ages who wore activity tracking devices for seven days as part of national health surveys conducted between 2003 and 2006 in the US.

The study found that physical activity levels among children and teens were lower than previously thought. The World Health Organization recommends at least 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity a day for children ages 5 to 17.

Happy cyclistsBut in the study, more than 25 percent of boys and 50 percent of girls aged 6 to 11 and more than 50 percent of males and 75 percent of females aged 12 to 19 did not reach the WHO guidelines, according to the researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore.

"Activity levels at the end of adolescence were alarmingly low, and by age 19, they were comparable to 60-year-olds," senior study author and assistant professor in the department of biostatistics, Vadim Zipunnikov said in a news release.

"For school-age children, the primary window for activity was the afternoon between 2 p.m. and 6 p.m.," Zipunnikov said. "So, the big question is, how do we modify daily schedules, in schools, for example, to be more conducive to increasing physical activity?"

The study also found that the only increases in physical activity levels occurred among young adults during their 20s. Activity levels fell through midlife and older adulthood.

In all age groups, males tended to be more active than females. However, after midlife, men's activity levels fell sharply compared to females. And among adults aged 60 and older, men were more inactive and had lower light-intensity activity levels than females.

The researchers also identified different times throughout the day when activity was highest and lowest among the different groups. They said this information could help boost physical activity by targeting times with the least activity, such as during the morning for children and teens.

The study was published online recently in the journal Preventive Medicine.

Back to news menu

Useful links

If you have any other queries please contact us.

The Outdoor Experts is brought to you by ActSmart.